Bavinck on Believing what Special Revelation Teaches about General Revelation. Or, why I believe God created all things in six days.

Bavinck begins his discussion of revelation with the accurate observation that all religion is built upon revelation. There is no religion without revelation. Biblical religion is built upon two forms of revelation, generally identified as general and special revelation. General revelation is what is “clearly seen” by all men—God’s eternal power and divine nature demonstrated in creation and history (Rom. 1:20). Nature tells us that God is God. It does not, however, tell us how we are to be reconciled to God. For that man is in need of God’s special revelation. Special revelation “is that conscious act of God, by which he, in the way of a historical complex of special means (theophany, prophecy, and miracle) that are concentrated in the person of Christ, makes himself known” (p. 350). This special revelation continues today through Scripture.

What I particularly enjoyed about Bavinck’s treatment of general and special revelation was the connection he drew between the two. For the past century biblical Christianity has been under rather constant pressure to abandon belief in a 6-day creation by the word God. While mainline denominations quickly acquiesced, conservative Christians sought more creative ways to incorporate Darwin into Genesis. Prominent among these innovations was the gap theory popularized by the Scofield reference Bible. Other popular alternatives to the traditional interpretation of Genesis are the day-age theory and the literary framework theory.

Bavinck does an excellent job of addressing the importance of accepting the biblical account of creation:

The work of God outward began with the creation. The creation is the first revelation of God, the beginning and foundation off all subsequent revelation. The biblical concept of revelation is rooted in that of creation. God first appeared outwardly before his creatures in the creation and revealed himself to them. In creating the world by his word and making it come alive by his Spirit, God already delineated the basic contours of all subsequent revelation. But immediately linking up with the event of creation is the action of providence. This, too, is an omnipotent and everywhere-present power and act of God. All that happens is, in a real sense, a work of God and to the devout a revelation of his attributes and perfections.

Any plain reading of Scripture gives the clear impression that God creates the universe and all that is in it instantly by his powerful word (Gen. 1:1-2:1; Ps. 33:6, 9; 148:1-5; Heb. 11:3; 2 Pet. 3:5, that he did so in six days (Gen 1:1-2:1; Ex. 20:11; 31:17; Heb. 4:3-4), and that it was not millions of years ago. In his treatment of creation and our understanding of it, Bavinck is doing the same thing the author of Hebrews does in chapter 11 of his work.

Hebrews 11, of course, is the great chapter of faith: the word is used 26 times in 40 verses. What should not be missed in Hebrews 11 is the organic nature of faith. The faith that draws near to God is the same faith that believes he made everything by his word is the same faith that invigorates obedience is the same faith that leads to inheritance of eternal reward. Faith does these things and it does all these things.

So what fossil that you see is so stunning that it that is causes you to question a conviction of things not seen?

What theory or argument or explanation is so persuasive that it causes you to lose the assurance of things hoped for?

What does Scripture teach about God that causes you to believe he could not have created all things instantly by his word 6-10 thousand years ago? Is he not powerful enough? Not wise enough? Not good enough? “Ah, Lord GOD! It is you who have made the heavens and the earth by your great power and by your outstretched arm! Nothing is too hard for you” (Jer. 32:17). Is it just too hard to believe that God could have done what the Bible appears to teach he did and what the church for centuries taught that he did? Is this too hard for God?

Indeed, creation is “the beginning and foundation of all subsequent revelation.” So when you deny that Genesis, Exodus, Psalms, and Hebrews mean what they say, do not be surprised when your children deny that the Gospels and Romans mean what they say. Do not be surprised when your grandchildren deny any meaning to Scripture. By faith the people of old received their commendation (Heb. 11:2). By lack of faith people of today receive their condemnation.

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