I am a white man. I am not ashamed.

I am a white man.

That doesn’t mean I hate you.

That doesn’t mean I think you hate me.

That doesn’t mean I think I’m better than you.

That I deserve more than you.

That I am anything more than you.

I am a white man.

I have never owned I slave.

No one I have ever known has ever owned a slave.

I am not going to apologize for something I have never been a part of.

I am a white man.

I have never been to Sanford, Florida.

I never met Trayvon Martin.

I have never met George Zimmerman.

Thabiti Anyabwile, Justin Taylor, Al Mohler and every other PC evangelical and media talking head trying to make me feel shame for simply being a white man…

…that’s racist.

I am a white man.

I am not ashamed.

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2 thoughts on “I am a white man. I am not ashamed.

  1. You are a white man.

    God made you that way.

    You are made in God’s image.

    You never need to be ashamed of God’s work.

    You never need to be ashamed of being a white man.

    I’m glad you’re not ashamed.

    I was not trying to make you feel ashamed.

    If you feel ashamed of being a white man…

    the problem must be in your own actions or heart…

    …or in your definition of what it means to be white…

    …or in your association with some shameful things some other people have done.

    But even then, you never need be ashamed of God having made you white.

    At least that’s how I feel about it.

    Thabiti

    • Thabiti,

      Well it was certainly a surprise to hear from you: and so soon after my initial post. Do you have family working for the NSA? I am thankful that you have shown yourself willing to dialogue on things like this. I did not follow all of your conversation with Doug Wilson, but I was impressed that it went on.

      Providentially, this morning my scheduled Bible reading took me through Ecclesiastes 4 where I read:
      Again I saw all the oppressions that are done under the sun. And behold, the tears of the oppressed, and they had no one to comfort them! On the side of their oppressors there was power, and there was no one to comfort them. And I thought the dead who are already dead more fortunate than the living who are still alive. But better than both is he who has not yet been and has not seen the evil deeds that are done under the sun. Then I saw that all toil and all skill in work come from a man’s envy of his neighbor. This also is vanity and a striving after wind. (Ecclesiastes 4:1-4)

      And Acts 17, where I read:
      The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in temples made by man, nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mankind life and breath and everything. And he made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth, having determined allotted periods and the boundaries of their dwelling place, that they should seek God, in the hope that they might feel their way toward him and find him. Yet he is actually not far from each one of us… (Acts 17:24-27)

      You wrote, “If you feel ashamed of being a white man…the problem must be in your own actions or heart” I agree. So I resent and revolt against all the calls that what happened to Trayvon Martin is somehow an indication of a racially divided country. When someone who has a pattern of poor life-decisions (like Trayvon) collides with someone who, himself, does not demonstrate prudence or wisdom (like George Zimmerman), these kinds of things can happen. I resent and revolt against the subtle and plain charges that what happened to Trayvon Martin happened because white people (or Hispanic people, or white-Hispanic people, or…) dislike, distrust, and despise black people. I don’t. And the charge that I do does nothing to help anyone. The initial police investigation found nothing worth pursuing. The FBI investigated and found no evidence Zimmerman was racially motivated. A jury of his peers said the same thing. Why are intelligent Christian commentators like you continuing to play the race card?

      I resent and revolt against the entire innocent child victimization portrayal. Trayvon was not a 13 year old kid as pictured on your blog. I have seen the 7-11 video from the night of his death. He was a man. Zimmerman had a broken nose and abrasions to the back of his head. I’ve seen a few fights and might have even been in a couple. Those kinds of injuries aren’t usually inflicted on someone who is on top of another person raining punches. I think it is usually the other way around. Why do reasonable Christian men like you continue to propagate the picture of Trayvon as some innocent child picking daisies in the country side? Was he doing anything wrong that night? Not that anyone knows of. Did he somehow “deserve” what happened to him? Of course not. But it happened. Attributing false and misleading reasons for the event, or portraying the parties as something they were not, does nothing to help the situation.

      I hear mention every now and then of a post-racial society: which only shows that society isn’t. Unfortunately, a large portion of black America is oppressed. As is a large portion of white America. They are oppressed by a government that pays them to remain poor. They are oppressed by a government that rewards them for having broken families. They are oppressed by civic and religious leaders who tell them the problem is “the man.” They are oppressed by the Adversary and unable to call sin “sin.” They are oppressed by the oppression of victimhood: of thread-bare solutions to non-existent problems. I am a white man. I do not accept responsibility for these problems and I reject any attempts to make me feel guilty for them.

      The gospel is the only answer. A man cannot love or be loved apart from God’s love in Christ. Racial alienation is not the problem. Fomenting it is not the solution.

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