Faith

I have commented on several occasions about the Bible reading plan I am using and the benefit it offers of seeing the Scripture in multiple places. Today the first 3 readings struck a chord.

First up was Luke 5. Jesus told the disciples to drop in their nets for a catch. Peter, an experienced fisherman, wondered at the point since they had toiled all night and caught nothing. But he considered the source, “But at your word I will let down the nets.” Peter knew it was pointless, but he also knew the One who gave the command. A man with leprosy came to Jesus knowing the Lord could heal him. A paralytic was brought to Jesus by his friends. Jesus saw their faith and forgave the paralytics sin. And then Jesus healed the man to show that he was indeed God who could forgive sins.

Next up was Numbers 13. After seeing the ten plagues the Lord visited on Egypt; after seeing the Red Sea parted; after seeing the Lord come down on Sinai; after eating the Manna; after seeing the Lord judge the sin of Nadab and Abihu, of Miriam and Aaron; the people come to the border of the promised land. Ten of the spies sent into the Lord falter in their faith, give a bad report, and discourage the people from entering the land.

 

The third passage was Hebrews 11. I trust that little needs to be said about such a well known chapter. In all three places the message is the same: faith works. Peter dropped the nets into an empty lake because he had faith in the Lord who commanded. The children of Israel failed to enter God’s rest because they did not believe the God who promised. By faith Abel offered; Noah constructed; Abraham obeyed and offered; Moses left and returned to Egypt…and left again; Rahab welcomed the spies.

Faith is not something merely abstract, intellectual, internal, or even spiritual. Faith can be seen. Faith shows itself. It works. Faith is not something instantaneous or self-contained. It continues. It is tenacious. Faith continues to work even when the Lord does not miraculously provide, heal, or deliver. For it is by faith:

 Some were tortured, refusing to accept release, so that they might rise again to a better life. Others suffered mocking and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword. They went about in skins of sheep and goats, destitute, afflicted, mistreated– of whom the world was not worthy–wandering about in deserts and mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth.

Faith abides.

Bavinck on Believing what Special Revelation Teaches about General Revelation. Or, why I believe God created all things in six days.

Bavinck begins his discussion of revelation with the accurate observation that all religion is built upon revelation. There is no religion without revelation. Biblical religion is built upon two forms of revelation, generally identified as general and special revelation. General revelation is what is “clearly seen” by all men—God’s eternal power and divine nature demonstrated in creation and history (Rom. 1:20). Nature tells us that God is God. It does not, however, tell us how we are to be reconciled to God. For that man is in need of God’s special revelation. Special revelation “is that conscious act of God, by which he, in the way of a historical complex of special means (theophany, prophecy, and miracle) that are concentrated in the person of Christ, makes himself known” (p. 350). This special revelation continues today through Scripture.

What I particularly enjoyed about Bavinck’s treatment of general and special revelation was the connection he drew between the two. For the past century biblical Christianity has been under rather constant pressure to abandon belief in a 6-day creation by the word God. While mainline denominations quickly acquiesced, conservative Christians sought more creative ways to incorporate Darwin into Genesis. Prominent among these innovations was the gap theory popularized by the Scofield reference Bible. Other popular alternatives to the traditional interpretation of Genesis are the day-age theory and the literary framework theory.

Bavinck does an excellent job of addressing the importance of accepting the biblical account of creation:

The work of God outward began with the creation. The creation is the first revelation of God, the beginning and foundation off all subsequent revelation. The biblical concept of revelation is rooted in that of creation. God first appeared outwardly before his creatures in the creation and revealed himself to them. In creating the world by his word and making it come alive by his Spirit, God already delineated the basic contours of all subsequent revelation. But immediately linking up with the event of creation is the action of providence. This, too, is an omnipotent and everywhere-present power and act of God. All that happens is, in a real sense, a work of God and to the devout a revelation of his attributes and perfections.

Any plain reading of Scripture gives the clear impression that God creates the universe and all that is in it instantly by his powerful word (Gen. 1:1-2:1; Ps. 33:6, 9; 148:1-5; Heb. 11:3; 2 Pet. 3:5, that he did so in six days (Gen 1:1-2:1; Ex. 20:11; 31:17; Heb. 4:3-4), and that it was not millions of years ago. In his treatment of creation and our understanding of it, Bavinck is doing the same thing the author of Hebrews does in chapter 11 of his work.

Hebrews 11, of course, is the great chapter of faith: the word is used 26 times in 40 verses. What should not be missed in Hebrews 11 is the organic nature of faith. The faith that draws near to God is the same faith that believes he made everything by his word is the same faith that invigorates obedience is the same faith that leads to inheritance of eternal reward. Faith does these things and it does all these things.

So what fossil that you see is so stunning that it that is causes you to question a conviction of things not seen?

What theory or argument or explanation is so persuasive that it causes you to lose the assurance of things hoped for?

What does Scripture teach about God that causes you to believe he could not have created all things instantly by his word 6-10 thousand years ago? Is he not powerful enough? Not wise enough? Not good enough? “Ah, Lord GOD! It is you who have made the heavens and the earth by your great power and by your outstretched arm! Nothing is too hard for you” (Jer. 32:17). Is it just too hard to believe that God could have done what the Bible appears to teach he did and what the church for centuries taught that he did? Is this too hard for God?

Indeed, creation is “the beginning and foundation of all subsequent revelation.” So when you deny that Genesis, Exodus, Psalms, and Hebrews mean what they say, do not be surprised when your children deny that the Gospels and Romans mean what they say. Do not be surprised when your grandchildren deny any meaning to Scripture. By faith the people of old received their commendation (Heb. 11:2). By lack of faith people of today receive their condemnation.